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Digital Library Federation Survey
Calling all digital library users! The Digital Library Federation is sponsoring a survey of special collections researchers who have accessed born digital content. For this survey, we consider born digital material to be archival material that did not start out in a paper or analog format. This might include things like email, digital files, disk images, archived websites, research data or other kinds of data, digital images, sound and video. If you’ve used material like this, we’d love to hear from you. The survey focuses on your research needs, how you’ve accessed born digital materials, and what you wish the libraries and archives could do better. The anonymized results of the survey will be shared publicly on an open access platform in 2019.
Any library or archive patron using or interested in using born digital special collections is encouraged to take the survey: https://harvard.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0uNsRnVaZ4s2CMd. The survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete, and the survey will close on June 15, 2019.

Society Offices Moving from Mississippi State in early June
In early June following our annual meeting, the Society offices will be moving from Mississippi State University's History Department, which has hosted AHS since 2010.

J.L. Anderson of Mount Royal University will become the executive secretary and Sara Morris will be the new treasurer.

All communication regarding society business should be directed to Anderson and Morris effective June 9, 2019.

How is climate change like the boll weevil?
AHS executive secretary Jim Giesen found an ag history angle in a recent Businessweek story about climate change. Click here to read.

Call for advisors and volunteers on Neolithic Studies project
The OTS Foundation for Neolithic Studies has undertaken development of a museum/learning center about the ancient genesis and spread of agriculture and the significant lifestyle changes that ensued. Presenting Global Cultural Heritage, this is the story of the first built environment and a direct path of shaping contemporary life that now impacts the entire planet. We will also be representing the world's oldest buildings and the anthropology of their creation, which triggered agricultural development in the west. A USA location for the project is yet to be determined, although Florida is being considered. This is a vast initiative for which presenting partners, advisors and volunteers are now being sourced. Interested parties are encouraged to contact Linda Eneix at the OTSF USA office: 941 803 4908 email: Linda.Eneix@OTSF.org

Sandwell wins Article Price
Congratulations to Ruth Sandwell for winning the Petroleum History Society's article of the year award for "The Coal-Oil Lamp," which appeared in Ag History last year in the special issue "Artifacts in Agraria."

Call for Papers: Rural History 2019
Call for Papers

Rural History 2019 (10-13 September 2019, Paris, France)

Dreaming California: the myth of the “cornucopia” as a
transnational model for innovations in agriculture (1860s-2010s)

Organizers: Niccolò Mignemi (ERHIMOR), Alexia Blin (Université Paris 3
Sorbonne-Nouvelle) and Vicente Pinilla (Universidad de Zaragoza)

Code number of the panel: 231136

This panel aims to explore the making and remaking of California as a long-term and transnational reference for innovation in the agricultural, agri-food and rural fields. The idea here is not to explore the history of the Californian countryside and primary sector between the 1860s and today. Rather, the goal of the panel is to analyze how the myth of the Golden State as a cornucopia has been cyclically reinvented and mobilized in various contexts and at different levels over the past 150 years as a frontier of (technological, scientific, economic, and social) innovation in domains related to agricultural, rural, and food change.

Since the mid-19th century, the rise of American exports on world agricultural markets has also propagated the myth of California’s natural abundance. In the years following the Gold Rush, the fertility of Californian land and suitable climate continued to attract new settlers from the eastern territories of the United States, as well as foreign (Mexican, Asian and European) migrants. Farmers profited from the grain boom of the 1860s-1870s. Then, California shifted dramatically from extensive to intensive agriculture and began to specialize in cash crops (nuts, grapes, citrus, and deciduous fruits), occupying the top position globally starting in the 1890s. This transformation was made possible by natural conditions, but fundamentally it was supported by investments in infrastructure (irrigation and transportation), technology, and biological innovation. At the same time, the joint action of governmental bodies, economic actors, and civil society encouraged economic and social initiatives to promote growth and respond to potential consequences on market, labor, and environmental equilibria.

In an age when the common issue of agricultural development rallied international scientific, economic and political networks, California established itself as a transnational model of
experimentation in the vast domains related to agricultural production, agro-industrial processing, and food consumption. Its orchards were used for technological experimentation and plant breeding. The packed fruits conquering European markets both frightened and fascinated Mediterranean competitors. The struggles of local farm workers helped galvanize civil rights movements. Thus, the state of California became one of the most widely cited references in global discussions about the capitalist development of agriculture, in both positive and negative terms. California has maintained its position throughout the 20th century, and today the consequences of pesticide use and GMOs can be observed here, alongside changes born out of recent debates on the agroecological turn, organic farming and alternative food systems.

Submissions may fall under one or more of the following themes:
- Exploring scientific, technological, economic, and social experiments from around the world that reference the California model while striving to promote local innovation in order to modernize agricultural production and markets, transform the industrial use of natural resources, and
encourage new models and standards in food consumption.
- Analyzing the critical views that attack the Californian “factories in the fields” model, which exemplifies the effects of the intensive exploitation of human and natural resources for capitalist agricultural development, polluting the environment, industrializing the production of foodstuffs, and accentuating social and racial inequalities.
- Discussing the international networks and institutional channels connecting the rest of the world to local clusters of scientific, business and political actors, transforming California into a
hegemonic center where the innovation process has constantly been fueled and renewed by knowledge and experience coming from the peripheries.

Proposals should include a short abstract (up to 400 words) introducing the topic, its scope and approach, and should join a pdf file with a one-page CV. Proposals should be submitted via the
conference’s platform: https://eurhoparis2019.sciencesconf.org/user/submit
The deadline for paper submissions is 1st February 2019. We will aim to inform you about our decision by 28 February 2019.
For questions, do not hesitate to contact us at: niccolo.mignemi@gmail.com

AHS Member Tore Olsson pens WaPo piece on Trump's Wall Plan
Check out Tore Olsson's Washington Post article on the American origins of Mexico's rural transformation. Read it here.

Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History 2019
Call for Papers: The Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History (SFARE) is now accepting proposals for its annual conference, to be held at Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas, April 26-27, 2019.

Now in its twelfth year, SFARE provides a collegial setting for advanced graduate students and established scholars to present material that pushes the boundaries of agricultural, rural, and environmental history. In keeping with SFARE’s tradition of fostering a welcoming and constructive atmosphere, participants should plan to attend all panels (there are no concurrent sessions) in order to provide quality feedback for each presenter. This year’s event is supported by the Department of History and University Speakers & Issues Series at Midwestern State University, with additional support from the Center for the History of Agriculture, Science, & the Environment of the South (CHASES) at Mississippi State University and the Agricultural History Society.

Christopher Morris will deliver this year’s keynote address on nitrogen networks in a global context, the subject of his current book project. Dr. Morris is Professor of History at the University of Texas at Arlington and the author of Becoming Southern: The Evolution of a Way of Life, Warren County and Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1770-1860 and The Big Muddy: An Environmental History of Mississippi and Its Peoples from Hernando de Soto to Hurricane Katrina.

Work on all geographic locations and time periods is welcome. Faculty and students are invited to submit panel, roundtable, or single-paper proposals on any topic dealing with rural, agricultural, or environmental history. Please submit a 250-word paper proposal or a 500-word panel proposal, along with a one-page cv for each person involved, to Dr. Whitney Snow at whitney.snow@msutexas.edu.

The deadline for submission is January 28. Responses will be sent by February 11.

Ag History at the AHA
The AHA is grateful for the spirit of scholarly collaboration with its affiliated societies year round. Our 133rd annual meeting, in January 2019, represents a unique opportunity for face-to-face interaction with historians in your field from around the world. This year, we have compiled some of the many sessions that may be of interest to the Agricultural History Society members. We would appreciate if you would share these panels with your members.

The Past, Present, and Future of Museums of Food, Agriculture, and Rural Life

Globalization and Industrialization: History and Food Panel

Ethnic Dynamics in American Cities, Suburbs, and Agri-towns: Explorations of How Ethnicity Shaped Urban Spaces after 1960

Indigenous People, Colonialism, Sovereignty, and Dam Projects in the Americas

Governing Human and Animal Populations from the Colonial to the Postcolonial World

Cultivating Environmental Reform: Competing Agrarian politics in 20th-Century Latin America

Unemployment, Insecurity, and Work Restructuring in the Americas, 1930s–90s

Get the #AHA19 app to curate your own annual meeting experience, and consider making plans to join us in Chicago from January 3-6, 2019, if you have not already. Register by December 14 for a discounted rate.

Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History 2019
Call for Papers: The Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History (SFARE) is now accepting proposals for its annual conference, to be held at Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas, April 26-27, 2019.

Now in its twelfth year, SFARE provides a collegial setting for advanced graduate students and established scholars to present material that pushes the boundaries of agricultural, rural, and environmental history. In keeping with SFARE’s tradition of fostering a welcoming and constructive atmosphere, participants should plan to attend all panels (there are no concurrent sessions) in order to provide quality feedback for each presenter. This year’s event is supported by the Department of History and University Speakers & Issues Series at Midwestern State University, with additional support from the Center for the History of Agriculture, Science, and the Environmental of the South (CHASES) at Mississippi State University and the Agricultural History Society.

Christopher Morris will deliver this year’s keynote address on nitrogen networks in a global context, the subject of his current book project. Dr. Morris is Professor of History at the University of Texas at Arlington and the author of Becoming Southern: The Evolution of a Way of Life, Warren County and Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1770-1860 and The Big Muddy: An Environmental History of Mississippi and Its Peoples from Hernando de Soto to Hurricane Katrina.

Work on all geographic locations and time periods is welcome. Faculty and students are invited to submit panel, roundtable, or single-paper proposals on any topic dealing with rural, agricultural, or environmental history. Please submit a 250-word paper proposal or a 500-word panel proposal, along with a one-page CV for each person involved, to Dr. Whitney Snow at whitney.snow@msutexas.edu.

The deadline for submission is January 28. Responses will be sent by February 11.

Call for Nominations for the Advisory Committee on Minority Farmers
On October 17, 2018, we published in the Federal Register (FR DOC# 2018-22149, Page 52377) a Notice of Solicitation for Applications. Applications were required to be received on or before November 1, 2018. We are extending the submission period to November 15, 2018.

We are soliciting nominations from interested organizations and individuals from among ranching and farming producers (industry), related government, civil rights, State, and Tribal agricultural agencies, academic institutions, commercial banking entities, trade associations, and related nonprofit enterprises. An organization may nominate individuals from within or outside its membership; alternatively, an individual may nominate herself or himself. Nomination packages should include a nomination form along with a cover letter or resume that documents the nominee's background and experience. Nomination forms are available on the internet at https://www.ocio.usda.gov/​document/​ad-755 or may be obtained from Mrs. Kenya Nicholas at the email address or telephone number noted above.

The Secretary will fill up to 15 vacancies from among those organizations and individuals solicited in order to obtain the broadest possible representation on the Committee. Equal opportunity practices, in line with the USDA policies, will be followed in all appointments to the Committee. To ensure that the recommendations of the Committee have taken into account the needs of the diverse groups served by the Department, membership should include, to the extent practicable, individuals with demonstrated ability to represent minorities, women, and persons with disabilities.

Signed in Washington, DC, this 25th day of October 2018.

Christian Obineme,

Associate Director, Office of Partnerships and Public Engagement.

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/11/06/2018-24208/advisory-committee-on-minority-farmers-request-for-nominations

Vernacular Architecture Forum Access Award
VAF ACCESS AWARD:

ACCESS AWARD: In an effort to bring fresh voices to the study of vernacular buildings and landscapes the Access Award supports  first-time attendance  by  scholars and students with limited professional exposure to the fields of architectural history and vernacular studies, as well as by  practitioners and independent scholars in the field.  The next meeting, Landscapes of Succession, will take place in Philadelphia, PA, May 29 - June 1, 2019. 

There is no geographic restriction on the award and local practitioners, scholars, and  students may apply. Winners are not required to give a paper at the meeting. The award will cover the cost of registration for the conference including tours. Winners who live more than 50 miles from the conference site will also receive a stipend of  $300 for travel and lodging, to be presented at the conference. Up to two awards will be  given per year. Winners, including those giving papers at the meeting, are required to write  an article to be published in the VAF’s newsletter,  VAN, discussing what they learned as  first-time attendees.

Applications should consist of a C.V. or resume and a one-page letter detailing how the candidate heard about the Access Award, why he or she  qualifies, and what interests him or her about attending a VAF meeting.   Materials should be submitted as email attachments in Word or PDF format to accessaward@vafweb.org. Questions  about the award may also be directed to that address.

The deadline for applications is January 5, 2019.  

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Contact Us

The Society Office
J.L. Anderson, Executive Secretary
jlanderson@mtroyal.ca
Sara Morris, Treasurer
semorris@ku.edu

The Editorial Office
Albert Way, Editor
away5@kennesaw.edu
Kennesaw State University
Dept. of History and Philosophy
402 Bartow Ave
Kennesaw, Georgia 30144